hoeferlin changing course 25.JPG

SPECULATE + SYNTHESIZE

“Water mingles with every kind of natural phenomenon; and more than one might imagine, it has also mingled with the particular destiny of mankind.”
— Fernand Braudel, Memory and the Mediterranean

The third category of [WA] proposes trans-boundary design strategies across entire river basins, and at multiple scales.

The work moves between Derek Hoeferlin's professional and teaching leadership initiatives and colloaborations.

MEkONG SPECULATIVE FUTURE

"from the third pole

to the nine dragons"

Keeping the Water, the Power, and the People within the Mekong River Basin

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 project team: Derek Hoeferlin (lead), Jess Vanecek, Rob Birch

project team: Derek Hoeferlin (lead), Jess Vanecek, Rob Birch

 

MISSISSIPPI SPECULATIVE FUTURE

"from the big six

to the BIRDSFOOT"

Transforming the Nutrients, the Sediments, and the Industries in the Mississippi River Basin

 

ST. LOUIS REGION FUTURE INDUSTRIES

rhine speculative future

"FROM THE RHEINQUELLE

TO THE LEO HOLLANDICUS"

(COMING SOON)

 "Leo Hollandicus," by Claes Janzsoon Visscher of Amsterdam (1648)  image courtesy: https://centrici.hypotheses.org/775 (public domain, accessed July 26, 2018)  Dutch landscape architect Steven Slabbers first introduced me to this image, in a lecture he delivered at a "Dutch Dialogues" workshop in New Orleans in 2009, sponsored by Waggonner & Ball Architects and the Royal Netherlands Embassy, Washington D.C. Paraphrasing Stevens' eloquent words:  although there are no lions in Holland, the lion is the symbol of Holland, and while in this depiction the lion faces defiantly towards Europe (and at the time, Spain), ultimately, the lion's true strength is its backbone -- which in reality are the dunes of Holland, and hence Holland's first line of defense from the surge of the sea.  

"Leo Hollandicus," by Claes Janzsoon Visscher of Amsterdam (1648)

image courtesy: https://centrici.hypotheses.org/775 (public domain, accessed July 26, 2018)

Dutch landscape architect Steven Slabbers first introduced me to this image, in a lecture he delivered at a "Dutch Dialogues" workshop in New Orleans in 2009, sponsored by Waggonner & Ball Architects and the Royal Netherlands Embassy, Washington D.C. Paraphrasing Stevens' eloquent words: although there are no lions in Holland, the lion is the symbol of Holland, and while in this depiction the lion faces defiantly towards Europe (and at the time, Spain), ultimately, the lion's true strength is its backbone -- which in reality are the dunes of Holland, and hence Holland's first line of defense from the surge of the sea.